Blueshift
wildcat2030:

What is the purpose of the Universe? Here is one possible answer.
-
The more we learn about the universe, the more we discover just how diverse all its planets, stars, nebulae and unexplained chunks of matter really are. So what is all this matter doing in our universe, other than just floating in space? Well, it just so happens that there is a theory that gives a kind of raison d’etre to our universe and all the objects flying through it. If true, it would mean that our universe is nothing more than a black hole generator, or a means to produce as many baby universes as possible. To learn more, we spoke to the man who came up with the idea. It’s called the theory of Cosmological Natural Selection and it was conjured by Lee Smolin, a researcher at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics and and an adjunct professor of physics at the University of Waterloo. (via What is the purpose of the Universe? Here is one possible answer.)

wildcat2030:

What is the purpose of the Universe? Here is one possible answer.

-

The more we learn about the universe, the more we discover just how diverse all its planets, stars, nebulae and unexplained chunks of matter really are. So what is all this matter doing in our universe, other than just floating in space? Well, it just so happens that there is a theory that gives a kind of raison d’etre to our universe and all the objects flying through it. If true, it would mean that our universe is nothing more than a black hole generator, or a means to produce as many baby universes as possible. To learn more, we spoke to the man who came up with the idea. It’s called the theory of Cosmological Natural Selection and it was conjured by Lee Smolin, a researcher at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics and and an adjunct professor of physics at the University of Waterloo. (via What is the purpose of the Universe? Here is one possible answer.)

speshal-k:

(via Can We Feed 7 Billion People?)
beyondgrave:

Kill them with your AWESOME 

beyondgrave:

Kill them with your AWESOME 

neutralistic:

p-etaluna:

p-etaluna:

So, why does time fly by as you get older? When you are younger, you have more novel, new experiences. You see your mother for the first time. You learn your first language. Everything around you is new information. When the brain puts together these new details, they seem slower when you look back on them. When you age, your understanding of the world is larger. But because you are constantly surrounded by the usual family, school and experiences, details aren’t taken in so intricately. This makes entire days seem like fleeting moments!
According to this psychological diagram, if you turned 80 - looking back, the middle of your life will appear to be your 20’s!
Moral of the story: Do something new every day to make your life seem longer and richer.

Please don’t change the source, guys

what omg nay this has so many notes, you go girl!

neutralistic:

p-etaluna:

p-etaluna:

So, why does time fly by as you get older? When you are younger, you have more novel, new experiences. You see your mother for the first time. You learn your first language. Everything around you is new information. When the brain puts together these new details, they seem slower when you look back on them. When you age, your understanding of the world is larger. But because you are constantly surrounded by the usual family, school and experiences, details aren’t taken in so intricately. This makes entire days seem like fleeting moments!

According to this psychological diagram, if you turned 80 - looking back, the middle of your life will appear to be your 20’s!

Moral of the story: Do something new every day to make your life seem longer and richer.

Please don’t change the source, guys

what omg nay this has so many notes, you go girl!

astronomicalwonders:

SuperNova Remnant 0509-67.5
image from: HubbleSite.org
for more wonders of the universe follow: AstronomicalWonders.tumblr.com

astronomicalwonders:

SuperNova Remnant 0509-67.5

image from: HubbleSite.org

for more wonders of the universe follow: AstronomicalWonders.tumblr.com

cjenkinsandhisworld:

To most people these are just cartoons. They remind them of their childhood and it gives them a nice feeling for a few moments. I’m the same except as a kid these things were sort of my life. They made my day better. I would wake up early on the weekend to watch and wait all day for school to be…

spaceplasma:

Huge Wildfire Damages Australia’s Largest Optical Observatory

A massive wildfire has damaged Australia’s largest optical astronomy facility, the Siding Spring Observatory, causing significant damage, observatory officials said.

All of the 18 people on site were evacuated safely, but five buildings, including a visitors center and lodge, were significantly damaged during the Wambelong fire, Erik Lithander, vice-president of Australian National University, which owns the facility, said during a press conference Sunday (Jan. 13).

“The decision has been made to close the Siding Spring Observatory for an initial two-week period to allow us to carry out a full assessment of the damage caused by the fire and to ensure that the site is safe for staff prior to their return,” Lithander said.

A team will begin investigating the buildings on site in the next week, to see how badly damaged the 12 telescopes at the facility are.

“An initial visual assessment shows that there does not seem to be significant damage to the buildings that house the telescopes,” Lithander said. “We do not yet know what impact the extreme heat and the ash might have on the telescopes themselves, and we won’t be able to carry out that assessment until we can enter the buildings and we can inspect the inside of them.”

Siding Spring Observatory stands on a site 3,822 feet (1,165 meters) above sea level on Siding Spring Mountain, also known as Mount Woorat, in the Warrumbungle National Park, outside of the town of Coonabarabran in New South Wales.

Australian National University had plans to build new telescopes at the facility by 2015, but the damage sustained during the fire could put those plans on hold.

This isn’t the first time wildfires have threatened Australian observatories. In 2003, raging fires caused $12 million (U.S.) worth of damage to the Mount Stromlo Observatory, located very near the Siding Spring Observatory, and made a near miss of the Canberra Deep Space Communication Complex, part of the worldwide Deep Space Network of radio antennas.

Source: Space.com

bunnybundy:

NASA on Tumblr, http://n-a-s-a.tumblr.com/

Behold.